Visitors Barred From Florida Prisons Until At Least July 15

June 30, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic visitation suspension at Florida prisons has been extended again, the Florida Department of Corrections announced Monday.

The visitor ban is in effect this time until at least July 15.

“The decision to reinstate the normal visitation schedule will be evaluated in consultation with public health experts,” the FDC said.

Inmates will continue to have access to their loved ones through mail, phone calls and video visitation. Legal visits will not be impacted, although attorneys are encouraged to consult with their clients via phone, email or mail during this time

As of Monday, 24 inmates have died from the virus, 1,963 have tested positive and 438 corrections staff have been infected, according to the agency.

Comments

5 Responses to “Visitors Barred From Florida Prisons Until At Least July 15”

  1. Really on July 5th, 2020 1:17 am

    Michelle you husband’s “victimless crime” is possession of cocaine. If he was in possession with intent to sell it’s hardly victimless. Looking at his previous charges and the amount of marijuana he was arrested on and did 5 years for he might have a history of street pharmaceutical sells. Not to mention that nice little aggravated battery with a deadly weapon. He was lucky they ran those 5 years concurrent even though they were separate incidents 2 months apart.

  2. David Huie Green on July 3rd, 2020 11:44 pm

    REGARDING:
    “my husband in over 6 months since he was incarcerated. Families are being seriously negatively affected by the inability to see loved ones. The inmates and their families mental and emotional health suffers and my son and I never committed a crime.”

    I regret the suffering your husband’s choice to commit crime is causing you and especially your son.

    Actions have consequences. His may even be keeping him alive since they are being more cautious than he was. Illness causes much suffering. Yours is some of it.

    If he survives, I hope you all have a good honest life that a son can look up to. I suggest you avoid justifying any other kind with things like, “It wasn’t that bad,” or, “He didn’t REALLY hurt anybody.” His crime is a burden on everyone and, for the good of all, I hope it was his last.

    David for better people

  3. Michelle Battista on July 2nd, 2020 12:12 pm

    It saddens me to see people concerned about what is getting into the jail other than a deadly virus, especially when my 2 year old son and I have not been able to see my husband in over 6 months since he was incarcerated. Families are being seriously negatively affected by the inability to see loved ones. The inmates and their families mental and emotional health suffers and my son and I never committed a crime. My husband’s crime was a non violent/victimless crime. With no access to family and a 2 year sentence…the punishment just does not fit the crime.

  4. Loved one on June 30th, 2020 9:52 am

    @JTV…..inmate visitation isnt how the majority of contraband is getting into prisons now. It is brought in by the “not so good” officer. If your reasoning is correct then how can contraband still be an issue in the prisons with visitation being suspended for so long and inmates being on lockdown most of the time? It’s easy for those officers to bring it in. Fellow officers turn their heads for fear of retaliation or to “get a cut”. Seen and heard it all. I’m not stating an opinion but its published on DOC website…..yes some friends of an inmate will still try but a lot is brought in by the employees.

  5. JTV on June 30th, 2020 5:47 am

    This should clean up the contraband problem for a while.





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