HS Basketball: Tate Boys, Northview Girls Win; Jay And Tate Girls Fall

November 30, 2016

Here’s a look at high school basketball scores from around the area Tuesday night:

BOYS

Tate 55, West Florida 50

The Tate Aggies picked up their first win of the young season at home Tuesday night 55-50 over West Florida. The Aggies were led by Robert Rush with 19. Up next, the Tate Aggies (1-3) will be at Pine Forest on Thursday.

GIRLS

Northview 44, Catholic 20

The Northview Lady Chiefs defeated the visiting Catholic High Lady Crusaders Tuesday night in Bratt, .  The Lady Chiefs will be at Chipley at 5:00 Thursday and at Baker at 5:30 on Friday.

For more photos, click here.

West Florida 56, Tate 19

The West Florida Lady Jaguars defeated the Tate Lady Aggies Tuesday 56-19. The Lady Aggies will host Escambia High School at 7 p.m. Wednesday.

Baker 57, Jay 26

The Jay Lady Royals (2-2) lost to Baker 57-26 Tuesday night at Jay. Corrissa Mulford added 10 points to lead the Royals. The Lady Royals will host Catholic High School on  Thursday at 4 p.m.

Pictured: Northview’s Lady Chiefs defeated Catholic Tuesday night. NorthEscambia.com photos, click to enlarge.

Deer Hunters: Help Monitor For CWD, Be Aware What You Can Bring Into State

November 28, 2016

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is looking to hunters to help monitor the state’s deer herd the coming season for chronic wasting disease, or CWD as it’s more commonly called. And any Florida hunter planning to hunt deer, moose or elk out of state this year needs to be aware of certain laws and regulations aimed at preventing CWD from entering our state.

What is CWD?

CWD belongs to a group of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Scientists still have much to learn about CWD, which appears to occur only in the deer family, but is believed to be caused by an abnormal protein called a prion.

Fatal CWD attacks the brains of infected cervids (mule deer, white-tailed deer, moose and elk), causing them to become emaciated, display abnormal behavior and lose control of bodily functions.

Warning signs of CWD hunters can look out for while in the field include deer that are extremely thin or appear sick, or those exhibiting odd behavior such as excessive salivating or urinating, staggering, walking in circles, standing with a wide stance, head tremors, or deer found dead from unknown causes. If you see a deer that fits this description, call 866-CWD-WATCH (293-9282).

Transmission of CWD occurs by direct contact with bodily fluids (feces, urine or saliva) or through contact with a contaminated environment. In this second scenario, the prion stays in the environment, and may remain infectious for years.

The good news is, there’s no evidence that CWD can be transmitted to humans or livestock, and it’s not yet been found in Florida or any other southeastern state. But it’s going to take the help of all hunters and the FWC to keep it that way.

Currently the only practical method for diagnosing CWD is through analysis of brain-stem tissue or lymph nodes from dead deer. Therefore Florida’s more than 200,000 hunters can play an extremely important role in CWD surveillance by providing samples from harvested deer for testing.

How you can help

The goal of the FWC is to collect these samples throughout Florida, and it’s asking private landowners and hunting clubs to participate in this surveillance effort. Since 2002, the FWC has tested nearly 9,000 hunter-killed, road-killed and sick/diseased deer for CWD.

If you’d like to help, contact the FWC by calling the toll-free CWD Hotline at 866-CWD-WATCH (293-9282) for further information and to coordinate collection and pick-up of deer samples.

To date, CWD has been found in mule deer, white-tailed deer, moose and elk in Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming. It also has been detected in Canada (Saskatchewan and Alberta), Norway and in South Korea.

The primary objective of CWD management is to prevent it from entering our state, so we have adopted laws regulating the transport of harvested deer into Florida.

What is legal to bring back when hunting out of state

It’s illegal for hunters to bring into Florida whole carcasses of any harvested cervid from any of the affected states or countries. From these areas, hunters can bring back only deboned meat and finished taxidermy mounts, hides, skulls, antlers and teeth, as long as all soft tissue has been removed. And citizens are encouraged to report to the FWC any illegal importation of cervids from affected areas by calling its Wildlife Alert Hotline, toll-free, 888-404-FWCC (3922).

Should a CWD outbreak occur in Florida, the keys to effective management will be detecting it early and taking swift action to limit its spread. Because of this, the FWC has a CWD action team made up of veterinarians, biologists, law enforcement officers and media folks, in place and ready to respond along with other government agencies, such as the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Florida Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

What’s the number to call?

This season, if you come across or harvest a deer that appears sick or emaciated, or one that has died from unknown causes, don’t handle it. Instead, contact the FWC, 24/7 on its toll-free hotline at 866-CWD-WATCH (293-9282).

It’s important to call as soon as possible so the carcass can be collected and tested while it is still fresh.

- See more at: https://www.morningagclips.com/help-monitor-for-cwd/#sthash.C2QDEQKL.dpuf

High School All-Star Games Moves Downtown

November 26, 2016

Pensacola Sports has announced the 2016 Subway High School All-Star Football Game will be played at the Blue Wahoos Stadium on December 16.  For the first time since the event’s inception in 2004 the all-star game will not be played at a high school. The game formerly rotated every two years between Escambia, Santa Rosa, and Okaloosa Counties.

The Subway High School All-Star Series, a Pensacola Sports event, selects seniors from the Escambia, Santa Rosa, and Okaloosa County high schools.  Every high school in the county is guaranteed representation, given they have an eligible senior.  The game features three days of practice and a banquet. It provides many players the opportunity to play one last high school game in front of their family and friends and provides additional exposure to college recruiters who attend the practice and games.

“After the success of UWF Football’s first year playing downtown, we felt moving the all-star game was a good fit for the event, the teams and families, the community, and downtown,” said Pensacola Sports President Ray Palmer.  “Being able to utilize the beautiful stadium and setting for this type of event is a great way to show the multi-purpose side of the facility.”

Coaches for this year’s game include Jerry Pollard (Pine Forest) and Kent Smith (Pace High), coaching the West and East, respectfully. Additionally, every high school will have representation on the coaching staff.  The rosters will be announced next week after the players have been notified of their selection.

“It’s big improvement to the game and the series. The kids are excited,” said Kent Smith, East Team Head Coach.  “It’s a great way to get more people to the game in a fun atmosphere. A lot of them have been to the UWF games and seen the atmosphere there and would like to be a part of something like that.”

FWC: Guide To Northwest Florida’s Fall Hunting Seasons

November 24, 2016

The Thanksgiving weekend means hunting in North Escambia. Here’s a loook at fall hunting information from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC):

General Gun Season

The general gun seasons begins Thanksgiving day and last four days (through Sunday). Two weeks later, the gun season reopens December 10 and runs through February 19.

During general gun season, only legal-to-take bucks as they are defined in each deer management unit may be harvested, but don’t forget that you need to purchase the $5 deer permit first. On private land, the daily bag limit on deer is two. Bag limits and other regulations for deer on wildlife management areas can differ, so before you hunt download the specific WMA brochure by going to MyFWC.com/Hunting.

You can hunt wild hogs on private lands year-round with no bag or size limits. Similarly, on most public lands there are no bag or size limits, and hogs are legal to take during most hunting seasons except spring turkey. On a few public hunting areas, specific bag and size limits do apply, so check the WMA brochure to be certain.

Hunters are allowed to take deer and wild hogs over feeding stations on private land, but that’s not the case on WMAs, no matter the season or the game.

It’s illegal to take deer using rimfire cartridges or non-expanding, full-metal case ammunition. Shooting a swimming deer also is against the law.

Private Land Does Days

Within the general gun season are antlerless deer days, better known to us hunters as “doe days.” These dates differ for each of the state’s 12 DMUs. To learn when these antlerless deer opportunities occur in your DMU, please refer to the “2016-2017 Florida Hunting Regulations” handbook, which you can pick up at your tax collector’s office, FWC regional office or by downloading it online at MyFWC.com/Hunting.

During these doe days, the daily bag limit is one legal antlered deer and one antlerless deer, or two legal antlered deer. You may not take two antlerless deer in one day as is allowed during the archery season, unless you have antlerless deer tags issued for the private land you hunt. Also, regardless of the season, deer gender or the number of permits, hunters are never allowed to harvest more than two deer per day under any circumstances. And except for a few WMAs, most do not have antlerless deer days.

Deer Dogs

Folks hunting deer with dogs on private or public lands, where it is allowed, must have their names and addresses displayed on their dogs’ collars. Hunters must confine their dogs to the tract of land on which they have permission to hunt and not allow them to wander off that land.

Hunters using dogs to take deer on private property must register the tract of land they will be hunting. The statewide deer-dog registration program doesn’t apply for training or hunting with deer dogs on WMAs.

The registration number may be issued to hunting clubs, landowners or anyone having permission to hunt deer with dogs on a particular tract of land upon filling out the required application. Application forms are available from all regional FWC offices and at MyFWC.com/Deer.

Once you’ve registered the property, you’ll be issued a number that must be attached to the collars of all dogs used to run deer on that property, when taking deer with dogs is permitted. All individuals must have a copy of the registration with them while they’re engaged in training or hunting with deer dogs.

Fall Turkey And Quail

Fall turkey season starts December 10, the same day as general gun season, and ends January 15.

Hunters may take only bearded turkeys and gobblers, and they must have a turkey permit ($10 for residents, $125 for nonresidents) to hunt them.

You may harvest up to two turkeys per day, if you’d like, but that would tag you out for the entire fall season – because you’re only allowed to harvest a total of two turkeys during the archery, crossbow, muzzleloading gun and fall turkey seasons combined. In Holmes County, the harvest of fall turkeys is not allowed at all. And there’s not a fall turkey season on WMAs, however, on a half-dozen areas, you are allowed to take turkeys during general gun season.

You’re not permitted to hunt turkeys with dogs or with recorded turkey calls, and you’re not permitted to shoot them while they’re on the roost or when you’re within 100 yards of a game-feeding station when feed is present.

The excitement the uproar a covey of bobwhite quail cause when suddenly taking to the air in front of a pointing bird dog is enough to thrill even the most seasoned veteran hunter. Quail season this year runs Nov. 12 – March 5, and the daily bag limit is 12. Bobwhites prefer a patchwork of brushy fence rows, weedy fields and open upland forests that are frequently burned. A good bird dog is essential in quail hunting and, for many hunters, watching the dog work and seeing its enjoyment is the most rewarding part.

Other Regulations

Shooting hours for deer, turkeys and quail are a half-hour before sunrise to a half-hour after sunset. All legal rifles, shotguns, muzzleloaders, bows, crossbows and handguns may be used to take each of these resident game animals during the general gun, fall turkey and quail seasons.

llegal firearms and ammunition are defined as centerfire, semiautomatic rifles having magazine capacities of more than five rounds, and fully automatic firearms. Other prohibited methods for taking game include shooting from a moving vehicle and herding or driving game with a vehicle.

Snipe and Dove

lorida ranks second in the nation in the number of snipe harvested each year, and the season always runs Nov. 1 – Feb. 15. Snipe hunting can offer unparalleled excitement as snipe fly with a fast, erratic flight pattern, presenting a challenge for hunters. The skill it requires to shoot a moving snipe is probably the main reason many hunters trounce through mud and muck to locate and flush snipe. The common snipe is a migratory game bird that is found in Florida only during the winter months, mostly in shallow wetlands, low pastures and open shorelines of lakes, ponds and streams. Hunting strategy is simple – find their habitat and walk until you flush one. And a close-working bird dog or retriever can be helpful in finding, flushing and retrieving snipe.

The second phase of the mourning and white-winged dove season this year runs Nov. 12 – Dec. 5. Shooting hours for both dove and snipe is a half-hour before sunrise to sunset.

There’s an eight-bird daily bag limit on snipe and a 15-bird bag limit on dove, and you must have the no-cost migratory bird permit if you want to hunt either of these migratory game birds.

The only firearm you’re allowed to hunt snipe and doves with is a shotgun, although you can’t use one larger than a 10-gauge. Shotguns also must be plugged to a three-shell capacity (magazine and chamber combined).

You may hunt either of these birds over an agricultural field, as long as the crop has been planted and manipulated by normal agricultural methods. However, you’re not allowed to scatter agricultural products over an area for the purpose of baiting.

If you’re up for the challenge, you may even use a bow or crossbow. Birds of prey also can be used to take snipe and doves by properly permitted individuals practicing falconry.

Some things you can’t do while hunting snipe and doves include using rifles or pistols, shooting from a moving vehicle, and herding or driving birds with a vehicle.

The FWC provides an online update that gives the latest information on Florida’s public dove fields. The address is MyFWC.com/Dove, and it’s updated throughout dove season. Information includes dove densities, previous week’s harvests and field conditions.

License And Permit Requirements

Florida ranks second in the nation in the number of snipe harvested each year, and the season always runs Nov. 1 – Feb. 15. Snipe hunting can offer unparalleled excitement as snipe fly with a fast, erratic flight pattern, presenting a challenge for hunters. The skill it requires to shoot a moving snipe is probably the main reason many hunters trounce through mud and muck to locate and flush snipe. The common snipe is a migratory game bird that is found in Florida only during the winter months, mostly in shallow wetlands, low pastures and open shorelines of lakes, ponds and streams. Hunting strategy is simple – find their habitat and walk until you flush one. And a close-working bird dog or retriever can be helpful in finding, flushing and retrieving snipe.

The second phase of the mourning and white-winged dove season this year runs Nov. 12 – Dec. 5. Shooting hours for both dove and snipe is a half-hour before sunrise to sunset.

There’s an eight-bird daily bag limit on snipe and a 15-bird bag limit on dove, and you must have the no-cost migratory bird permit if you want to hunt either of these migratory game birds.

The only firearm you’re allowed to hunt snipe and doves with is a shotgun, although you can’t use one larger than a 10-gauge. Shotguns also must be plugged to a three-shell capacity (magazine and chamber combined).

You may hunt either of these birds over an agricultural field, as long as the crop has been planted and manipulated by normal agricultural methods. However, you’re not allowed to scatter agricultural products over an area for the purpose of baiting.

If you’re up for the challenge, you may even use a bow or crossbow. Birds of prey also can be used to take snipe and doves by properly permitted individuals practicing falconry.

Some things you can’t do while hunting snipe and doves include using rifles or pistols, shooting from a moving vehicle, and herding or driving birds with a vehicle.

The FWC provides an online update that gives the latest information on Florida’s public dove fields. The address is MyFWC.com/Dove, and it’s updated throughout dove season. Information includes dove densities, previous week’s harvests and field conditions.

Northview Honors Cross Country Team

November 21, 2016

The Northview High School Cross Country team recently celebrated their season at Sky Zone in Pensacola. Awards presented included (listed below each photo):

Coach’s Award winners: Brandon Korinchak, Lexxi Baggett.

Most Improved: Starla Weaver.

Fastest: Brandon Korinchak and Marissa Rothrock.

Jumni Ross Award: Sara McCreary.

Seniors: Brandon Korinchak, Sara McCreary, Adrian King. Not pictured: Lettering: Jace Weber, Josiah Stilwell, Marissa Rothrock, Cheyenne Johnson, Kirsten White.

Photos for NorthEscambia.com, click to enlarge.



Tate’s Road To State Ends With Loss To Navarre

November 19, 2016

The Navarre Raiders defeated the  Tate Aggies Friday night 60-28 in the 6A regional semifinal.

It was the first playoff game hosted by the Aggies since 1977.

Navarre was on the board first with a 65-yard touchdown, 7-0 with 8:39 in the first. The Aggies quickly answered  16 seconds later with a 60-yard touchdown on a pass from Jake Henry to Shermari Jones, 7-7.

The Raider’s Michael Carter returned the kickoff nearly 100 yards, even knocking over a referee along the way, to give Navarre a 13-7 lead. Before the night was over, Carter racked up 330 plus rushing yards and had five touchdowns. He also had a 75-yard touchdown called back on a holding penalty.

With 8:56 to go in the half, Tate scored on a six-yard run from Corey Moorer. A good kick, and the Aggies were on top 14-13.  But Navarre took the lead 19-14 on a Carter TD. Tate quarterback put the Aggie back on top with a 63-yard touchdown run with 2:42 remaining the second quarter. A 35-yarder from Carter made it 25-21 headed into the half.

By the end of three, Navarre was up 46-21.

With 7:24 remaining in the ballgame,  Henry was in on quarterback keeper,  46-28. But Navarre went on to add a couple more touchdowns.

The Tate Aggies finished their season at 9-3.

Navarre (11-1) moves on to a road trip next week against the St. Augustine Yellow Jackets (11-1).

For a photo gallery, click here.

NorthEscambia.com photos by Kristi Barbour, click to enlarge.


Friday Night Playoff Final Scores

November 19, 2016

Here are Friday night playoff finals scores from around the North Escambia area.

FLORIDA

Navarre 60, Tate 28

Tallahassee Rickards 33, West Florida 30

Baker 21, Graceville 14

ALABAMA

Autauga 28, Escambia Academy 21

Northview Girls Out Lift Jay, Pensacola

November 17, 2016

The Northview Chiefs won a weight meet with Jay and Pensacola high schools Wednesday.

Results were as follows:

Northview 1st -53.5 points

Pensacola High 2nd -25.5 points

Jay 3rd -18 points

The following placed fire in their weight class

Crystal Douglas-Northview

Wynder, T-Pensacola

Myisha Syria- Northview

Tagert, H- Jay

Watson, H. –Jay

Kiara Baker- Pensacola

Mallory Gibson –Northview

Aubree Love –Northview

Savanna Roley –Northview

Summer Hodo -Northview

Photo for NorthEscambia.com, click to enlarge.

Ernest Ward Drops Two To Brewton Middle (With Gallery)

November 16, 2016

The Ernest Ward Eagles dropped two games to Brewton Middle School Tuesday night in Walnut Hill.

In girls action, Ernest Ward closed within one point with a buzzer shot, but Brewton Middle prevailed 22-21.

In boys action, Brewton Middle defeated Ernest Ward 50-28.

For a photo gallery with both girls and boys games, click here.

Next Tuesday, Ernest Ward hosts Perdido. Girls play at 5 p.m. followed by the boys at about 6 p.m.

NorthEscambia.com photos, including photos by Delaney Reynolds, click to enlarge.

Coaches, Rosters Set For High School All-Star Volleyball Game

November 16, 2016

Pensacola Sports is pleased to announce the tentative rosters for the 10th Annual SUBWAY High School All-Star Volleyball game to be held Thursday, November 17 at the University of West Florida Field House at 6 p.m.  The West Team is comprised of seniors from Escambia County while the East Team is made up of seniors from Santa Rosa and Okaloosa Counties.  The two teams will play a best of seven match to determine the winner.

The roster for the West Team:

  • Catholic — Mackie Doyle, Bailey Burns
  • East Hill — Kaylie Dickson
  • Escambia — Kallie Lewis
  • Northview — Jamia Newton
  • PCA — Kristen Siegler
  • Pensacola — Maya Humeda, Ra’Kell Watts
  • Pine Forest — Alexis Robinson, Meghan McLane
  • Tate — Brianna Payne
  • Washington — Marlis Herrick, Tea Wiley, Kourtney Way, Selena Williams, Taya Mata
  • West Florida — Harmoni Burton, Genny Anderson

The coaching staff for the West Team:

  • Head Coach, Danielle Self of Pine Forest High School
  • Assistant Coach, Dave Bryant of West Florida Tech High School

The roster for the East Team:

  • Baker — Whitley Taylor, Taylor Brunson
  • Central — Haley Gauthier
  • Choctaw — Evelina Teran
  • Crestview — Kierra Potts, Cailey Ness
  • Fort Walton — Zadie Engelberger
  • Gulf Breeze — Maddie Grace McCurdy, Jordan Taylor,
  • Jay — Carissa Mulford, Hannah Prescott, Hannah Vaughn,
  • Laurel Hill — Rachel Welsh
  • Milton — Ashley Matthews
  • Navarre — Haley Thompson
  • Niceville — Helene Masone, Stephanie Kaufman
  • Pace — Morgan Helton
  • Rocky Bayou – Maegan Cropsey

The coaching staff for the East Team:

  • Head Coach, Jessica Odom of Jay High School
  • Assistant Coach, Chelsey Adams of Milton High School

Tickets to the SUBWAY High School All-Star Game are $8 at the gate and $6 with a canned good. Pensacola Sports is teaming with Manna Food Bank for a canned good drive and encouraging everyone to help families by bringing a canned good item.

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