Scott Will Delay Joining Senate By Five Days To Remain Governor

December 5, 2018

Gov. Rick Scott announced Tuesday that he will serve out his full second term under an arrangement that will lead to a five-day delay in the Republican joining the U.S. Senate next month.

The 116th Congress, which includes the U.S. House and Senate, will start on Jan. 3. But Scott, who was first elected as governor in 2010 and re-elected in 2014, is scheduled to remain as governor until Jan. 8, when Gov.-elect Ron DeSantis’ term begins.

Scott, who narrowly beat Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson last month, had the option of resigning early as governor, joining the U.S. Senate on Jan. 3 and elevating Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera to the office of governor.

It would not be an unprecedented circumstance. It happened in January 1987, when Gov. Bob Graham resigned early to join the U.S. Senate, making Lt. Gov. Wayne Mixson the state’s 39th governor for a three-day period before Gov. Bob Martinez took office.

But Scott has opted to remain in office for his full term, his aides said Tuesday.

“When Gov. Scott was elected governor of Florida, he promised to fight for Florida families every single day of his term. Gov. Scott will remain governor until Jan. 8,” John Tupps, the governor’s communications director, said in a statement.

Tupps said U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has agreed to hold the Senate swearing-in ceremony for Scott on the afternoon of Jan. 8, which will be the day that inauguration ceremonies will be held in Tallahassee and DeSantis will become Florida’s 46th governor.

Scott will transition to his role as the state’s junior senator, joining U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio in giving Florida two Republican senators in the nation’s capital for the first time since the Reconstruction era.

The issue of when Scott would leave office drew extra scrutiny this year when it remained unclear whether Scott or the incoming governor would appoint three new justices to the Florida Supreme Court in January.

But the issue became largely moot, when the state Supreme Court ruled that the appointment power rests “solely” with the new governor.

DeSantis, in consultation with Scott, is reviewing 11 judges and lawyers who have been advanced by a nominating commission to replace justices Barbara Pariente, R. Fred Lewis and Peggy Quince. The three justices are leaving the state’s highest court on Jan. 8 because they have reached a mandatory retirement age.

by Lloyd Dunkelberger, The News Service of Florida

Comments

2 Responses to “Scott Will Delay Joining Senate By Five Days To Remain Governor”

  1. John on December 8th, 2018 4:35 pm

    I agree with Citizen. Scary how so many of these house races were close.

  2. Citizen on December 5th, 2018 11:30 pm

    This election was crucial. We narrowly missed a very dangerous outcome. Hopefully Florida will not be swayed toward socialism d the demise of the USA. Conservative appointed judges are imperative for the continued survival of the state and country. Having Scott in the senate is a blessing. Hopefully more voters will understand this and leave the democratic party.





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