‘200 Years Of Forgotten Alabama’ Author To Present Program Thursday

August 14, 2019

Alabama photographer Glenn Wills will bring his Forgotten Alabama Bicentennial Book Tour to the Flomaton Library on Thursday.

He will give a 45-minute presentation from his newest book “200 Years of Forgotten Alabama” at 6 p.m. at the library. The book features photographs of abandoned structures from all 67 of Alabama’s counties.

“This is the book I always wanted to do. 200 Years of Forgotten Alabama is, by far, the best, most comprehensive endeavor I’ve ever attempted. All 67 counties. 50,000 miles and thousands of hours have all culminated to this,” Wills said on his website.  “I came to appreciate our forgotten past. I have traveled the entire state documenting Alabama’s forgotten and abandoned structures that still exist. I’ve taken many of these images and made a multimedia presentation about my journey.

“To see life frozen in time. A mere fraction of a second from an earlier time captured for all eternity. I realized how much I enjoyed seeing photos from the past. While I could not go back in time and recreate the photos, I could still find the remnants of what was. One day all these things will be gone and I felt it an obligation to find and document them the best way I knew how. Through pictures.”

Wills has two other books – Forgotten Alabama and Forgotten Alabama 2. A set of all three autographed books will be given away at the Flomaton Library event. Admission is free, and the program is for all ages.

Comments

4 Responses to “‘200 Years Of Forgotten Alabama’ Author To Present Program Thursday”

  1. Telina Lambeth on August 15th, 2019 4:45 pm

    This is Amazing History….

  2. William Reynolds on August 14th, 2019 11:25 pm

    >>Where, and if, will these books be available for purchase? I really would like to add to my library.

    I would presume they would be for sale at the library program. His first two books are on Amazon, and all three are available on his website http://forgotten-alabama.squarespace.com/

  3. Facetious Bob on August 14th, 2019 11:18 pm

    William, my family history goes into early 1800’s Alabama. I have many old photos in
    my accumulation, including many documents and books.

    Where, and if, will these books be available for purchase? I really would like to add to my library.

  4. Historylover on August 14th, 2019 10:34 am

    I think this is fantastic. Alabama is a beautiful state (and my original home state). There’s a lot of abandoned places; some are in small towns, villages, and hamlets that still have some current residents. Like the author, I’ve gone out of my way to travel many of those old “country roads”. I look forward to seeing his work. It’s a glimpse of a bygone, simpler era.





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